What's your scenario?

I have conviction(s) for misdemeanors only

  YOU CAN VOTE!

I have a felony conviction, and have completed my probation or parole

 YOU CAN VOTE!

Has it been over a month since discharge? Click Here to Register!

Did you get off supervision within the past few weeks? Either go to the Registrars Office with your discharge paper, OR call VOTE and they will help you! 504-571-9599.

I have a felony conviction, and am still on probation or parole

 YOU CAN’T VOTE until you get off supervision.

Your probation/parole officer should give you discharge papers, and instructions on how you can register to vote.

Each month they will send the list of people discharged to the Secretary of State. After that happens, you will be able to register like anybody else (with either a state ID or a signed affidavit). If you will be discharged from probation close to an election deadline, be sure to contact VOTE to deal with any problems: 504-571-9599.

*The law changes in 2019, see more below!

I get off probation or parole before November 6th, 2018

You can vote this year- and you can vote to end Louisiana’s non-unanimous jury law by voting Yes on ballot Amendment 2!

If you have time to register before Oct. 8th, bring your discharge papers to the local registrar’s office.

If you get off between Oct. 8th and Election Day, contact Ilona Prieto at VOTE, for assistance: Ilona@vote-nola.org or (504) 571-9599. The registrar will likely claim you missed the registration deadline, however, your rights are being unsuspended in time and you should still have a right to vote, no differently than someone who moves into the state just prior to an election.

I voted before my conviction, can I just go vote again?

The state marks people as “inactive voters” if they do not respond to their surveys, and removes people from the voting rolls if they haven’t voted in the past two years. This is how they remove people who die, move away, or go to prison. If you have been in prison for over two years, you have most likely been removed from the list of registered voters, and need to register again.

Search the inactive voter list. If your name appears on the list, your voter registration status is inactive because your registration address was not able to be verified by your parish registrar of voters during the annual canvass or correspondence sent to the address on file has been returned undeliverable. If your residential address or the address where you receive mail has changed from the address used when you registered to vote or last changed your voter registration record, please update your residential address on your voter registration record online. You may also change it by mail or in person at your parish registrar of voters.

If you have not changed your address, you are currently eligible to vote but will be required to confirm your address when voting. If you do not confirm your address and you do not vote in any election between the time your name was added to the list and the day after the second regularly scheduled general election for federal office held after such date, your name may be removed from the voter registration list.

I will be on probation after March 1st, 2019

You can vote on March 1st, 2019 IF you have not been incarcerated for a violation on that probation.

Act 636 (passed in 2018) allows for people under supervision as long as they have not been incarcerated, based on that particular sentence, within the past five years.

Your past convictions (if you have any) have no impact on your voting rights. Only the current one.

Everyone on probation, having not yet dealt with any violations, starts out with their voting rights intact- and they will not be suspended until you go to prison.

Contact VOTE to spread the word and join a movement on Registration Day (check back in early 2019 for specifics). The Secretary of State SHOULD allow people to pre-register, similar to 17-year olds, so they have voting rights on March 1st.

I will be on parole after March 1st, 2019

You can vote after March 1st IF you will have been on parole for 5 years.

Act 636 (passed in 2018) allows for people under supervision as long as they have not been incarcerated, based on that particular sentence, within the past five years. Most paroles are shorter than 5 years, and those people will have voting rights the day they are off parole.

Your past convictions (if you have any) have no impact on your voting rights. Only the current one.

Contact VOTE to spread the word and join a movement on Registration Day (check back in early 2019 for specifics). The Secretary of State SHOULD allow people to pre-register, similar to 17-year olds, so they have voting rights on March 1st.

I want to challenge Louisiana’s suspension of my voting rights

Voice of the Experienced (VOTE) has filed a lawsuit, along with eight people on probation or parole, VOTE v. Louisiana. The case is pending in the Louisiana Supreme Court, and has the support of various civil rights groups. Learn more about the lawsuit HERE: http://www.vote-nola.org/vote-v-louisiana.html

VOTE v. Louisiana would end the limited restoration of rights under Act 636, and allow voting for all people except those currently incarcerated due to a felony conviction.

To get involved, contact VOTE’s staff attorney, Ilona Prieto, today! 504-571-9599 or Ilona@vote-nola.org

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